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BECOMING A CHEERLEADER - PART 1
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Being a cheerleader is a wonderful experience that all girls should have the opportunity to do. Unfortunately, in most areas you have to try out for the cheerleading squad and make the team before you learn how to cheer. This seems somewhat backwards. How can you make a squad if you have never cheered before and how can you learn to cheer if you are not on a squad? This article will help those who have never cheered before but are interested in giving it a shot.

Cheerleading is not as easy as it looks! It takes lot of hard work and dedication. It is about more than prancing around in a short skirt and being in the popular crowd. In fact, just because you are a cheerleader does not mean all of your social problems disappear. Being a cheerleader will not get you boyfriends or make people like you more. Therefore, if you are trying out for that reason, and be honest with yourself, you will not make a very good cheerleader. So, what do you need to do to make the team? Let us take it in baby steps.

The first thing you need to do is look at the current team. Look at their stunts and tumbling. Ask yourself if you would be able to do the things they are doing with practice. Also, find out how the Junior Varsity and Varsity squads are set up. Every school has a different way of doing things. Some have freshmen and sophomores on Junior Varsity and juniors and seniors on Varsity. Some schools also have a freshmen team. Some schools have the more talented cheerleaders on Varsity and the ones that are still learning on Junior Varsity. The best thing for you to do is to try out for cheerleading as a freshman. The coach will expect less out of a freshman; you will have a better chance of making the squad if you have never cheered before.

Once you have prepared your body for the rigors of a tryout and a long cheerleading season - which can last from September until April, you will want to make sure you satisfy all the other requirements too. Many schools require that cheerleaders, like all other students who perform in school activities, maintain certain grade point averages. While you may not see a connection between doing well in school and being a good cheerleader, it does not matter. Your school says that you need a certain GPA to participate, and if you do not make the grade, you will not be doing any cheerleading. How's that for a connection!

As well as good grades, most schools and clubs will require you to meet a few technical requirements too. The two most prevalent involve getting your parents' permission if you are under eighteen, and signing a waiver that releases your cheerleading organization from any liability if you get hurt while practicing or performing.

Finally, you have to make sure that you have the time to participate. While cheerleaders in teen movies seem to have the most exciting social lives on the planet, actual cheerleading squads often have to give up 25+ hours a week to practice . . . not to mention going to the actual games to do the cheerleading. It is a huge time commitment, so be 100% sure that you have the time to devote to it.